Nature Briefing

Filter By:

Article Type
  • How to spot collaborators that are fun to work with, make a fair contribution and share your ambitions. Plus, Australian researchers lament the state of science ahead of the election and four ways to stop future pandemics at the source.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • Scientists note that variants now seem to emerge roughly every six months — but say we shouldn’t rule out more surprises from SARS-CoV-2. Plus, the hidden chokepoints in global financial systems and childcare crowdfunding campaigns for academic parents.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • How a common sunscreen ingredient turns toxic in the sea, how renewable technologies are being developed in one of the northernmost towns in the world and how tree-ring scientists find old growth trees in New York City.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • Antibodies from more than 86,000 children in the United States show that reported infections are only the tip of the iceberg. Plus, WHO estimates of COVID deaths are almost triple official figures and how to remedy mental-health care in the United States.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • How to support one of the world’s most ambitious ecological projects. Plus, opera-inspired breathing can help with long COVID and the brightest extra-galactic pulsar ever seen was spotted by radio ‘sunglasses’.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • They might be hard to love, but parasites are pivotal parts of the natural world. Plus, how language-generation AIs could transform science and the month’s best science images.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • How the world can act to protect generations from the effects of malnutrition precipitated by the war on Ukraine. Plus, clues to the origins of cancer in a trove of tumour genomes, and the highest resolution image of the Sun’s disc and corona.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • The future of the world’s biggest biomedical research funder. Plus, the biodiversity footprint of the University of Oxford shows how to achieve net gain, and a fossil hints at colourful pterosaur feathers.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • Interest is surging in brain–computer interfaces that can help paralysed people to move, talk and touch. Plus, why longer-lived animals don’t get more cancer and why NASA should spearhead a mission to Uranus.

    • Flora Graham
    Nature Briefing
  • Groups of blind Mexican fish that communicate using clicks appear to be developing cave-specific accents. Plus, the impact of COP26 pledges, and how machine learning is helping mathematicians.

    • Emma Stoye
    Nature Briefing